Graduate Course Offerings

Fall

Theory of the firm and industry; single and multiple products; risk and uncertainty.

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This course provides a graduate-level overview of development economics from a policy-oriented perspective. The goal of this course is to allow students to analyze policy debates surrounding economic growth and development from a broad and rigorous analytical base. Topics covered include theories of economic growth, poverty, inequality, education, health, gender inequality, development programs, and psychological and social foundations of economic development.

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Economics of farm- and household-level decision making. Study input and output markets, technology adoption and social economics in lower-income countries.

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The objective of the course is to provide a sound understanding of fundamental statistical theory underlying econometric techniques utilized in quantitative analysis of problems in economics, business, and finance, public health and other social sciences.

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Emphasis in the course is on econometric model specification, estimation, inference, forecasting, and simulation. Applications with actual data and modeling techniques are emphasized.

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Economic incentives, tradable permits and markets for ecosystem services are pivotal in contemporary water and environmental policy. This class covers theory and application of economic concepts needed to evaluate water and environmental laws and policies; including ecosystem service provision, tradable use permits, benefit cost analysis, externalities, public goods and valuation methodologies. Case studies include federal, state, tribal and international water and environmental policies.

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Intensive course in essential mathematics for entering graduate students in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs in Economics and Agricultural and Resource Economics. Topics covered include matrix algebra, functions, limits, differentiation, comparative statistics, and constrained and unconstrained optimization.

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The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

Spring

Theory of the consumer, demand, and market equilibrium, and welfare analysis.

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Econometric model-building, estimation, forecasting and simulation for problems in agricultural and resource economics. Applications with actual data and models emphasized.

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Application of financial management principals and tools to challenges and opportunities facing agribusiness firms. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition, allocation, control and transfer of capital resources. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper of publishable quality which analyzes a current financial issue or problem in the agricultural sector and selected readings in professional journals.

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This course focuses on economic methods for designing and evaluating water, food and environmental policies. Topics include optimizing water as an input in producing food, energy, recreation, and other ecosystem services; water & environmental issues in food production; pricing and conservation incentives; managing shortage risks; and economic tools for addressing conflicts over water, food and the environment. Interactive seminar style course.

In addition to the requirements for AREC 479, graduate students must complete a class project, including a paper and presentation. Interactive seminar style course; regular attendance essential. Calculus proficiency required.

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The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

Current course offerings by semester:

Are You a Current Student? Connect with an Advisor.

Danielle Buhrow, undergraduate senior academic advisor and graduate program coordinator for the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, is here to help! Schedule an appointment in Trellis Advise or send an email with your questions.